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A Brand Without a Cause


By on February 16, 2017

The Trump administration has long been vocal about their desire to see the Johnson Amendment (the one that prohibits tax-exempt organizations from endorsing or opposing political candidates), repealed. It is one of the pillars of our government, and a way to protect the religious freedom of everyone in this country from having to subscribe to a particular dogma to avoid persecution.

No one should see this as a surprise, it’s been touted for months that this was in the plans. Clearly there are issues that could arise from this, and it’s never been a secret that many organizations around the country have thrown their support to particular politicians who champion their cause. Youngry isn’t here to support to shame this aimed repeal. What we see is opportunity.

Five years ago the popular chicken sandwich chain Chick-fil-A was battling controversy when their COO, Dan T. Cathy, made a series of remarks against the legalization of gay marriage. The topic was a trending one in the country as earlier that year President Obama had announced his support of the civil liberty. Protests and boycotts were held, college students were up in arms, and the company’s charitable arm, the WinShape Foundation, released a statement announcing that they’d cease funding of organizations that opposed gay marriage.

The reaction was fierce. Then Governor of Arkansas Mike Huckabee initiated a Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day that garnered over 600,000 supporters on the Facebook Event. Proponents of banning gay marriage poured in to show support for a company that stayed with their values and felt were being unfairly attacked by a leftist media. Ultimately Chick-fil-A saw a 12% sales growth that year, thanks to its passionate proponents.

In this state of “Us vs Them” vital, identifying a brand with a mission, a cause may be the way to generate the best option to garnering a loyal base of like-minded individuals. Choose wisely.


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